Stay in the loop with all things Art+Feminism.

“The reality is that, for all the sustained and meaningful efforts of so many, gender bias remains very real today. And like most things in 2017, this bias, in its many guises, plays out pretty well on the internet.” Refinery 29‘s Lily Silverton spoke with Art+Feminism. 

ORGANIZERS ALSO DEBUT NEW ART COMMISSIONING PROGRAM

New York City — Over 2,500 participants at more than 200 events around the world participated in Art+Feminism’s fourth annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, which took place across the month of March around Women’s History Month. This global effort created or improved nearly 6,500 articles on Wikipedia, almost twice the output of the 2016 events. The month-long series of Edit-a-thon events was designed to generate coverage of feminism and the arts on Wikipedia — a response to the well-known gender gap on Wikipedia.
Highlights of the 2017 Edit-a-thon include content added to Wikipedia pages for niv Acosta, Hilma af Klint, Morehshin Allahyari, Xenobia Bailey, Rebecca Belmore, Hannah Black, Octavia E. Butler, Lygia Clark, Andrea Crespo, Leslie Hewitt, Christine Sun Kim, Deana Lawson, New media art, Sondra Perry, Paul B. Preciado, and Martine Syms.

“We were heartened by the response to our call to arms to fight against disinformation and fake news with facts,” said Art+Feminism organizers Siân Evans, Jacqueline Mabey, McKensie Mack, and Michael Mandiberg. “The efforts of Art+Feminism participants in 42 countries across the world nearly doubled last year’s results. We continue to be inspired by all the dedicated folks who make room in their busy schedules to share skills and improve a collectively held resource like Wikipedia.”

On the eve of the March edit-a-thons, Art+Feminism announced the debut of the Call to Action Art Commission program. Each year, an artist will be commissioned to create a Creative Commons licensed artwork. Divya Mehra was selected for the inaugural commission. Her work Dangerous Women (Blaze of Glory), 2017 depicts a jerrycan with the word “edit” emblazoned on the face of the container. With a dry, disruptive sense of humor, the work suggests a source of untapped energy and the need for reinvigorating change. Mehra’s research-fuelled practice explores diasporic identities, racialization, otherness, and the construct of diversity. Her work has been exhibited and screened at Creative Time, MoMA PS1, MTV, The Queens Museum of Art, MASS MoCA, amongst others. Mehra holds an MFA from Columbia University and is represented in Toronto by Georgia Scherman Projects, Toronto.

In New York, the edit-a-thon at The Museum of Modern Art featured a panel discussion between writer Joanne McNeil and Data & Society Research Institute Fellow Zara Rahman, moderated by Kimberly Drew (aka @museummammy), social media manager for the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The lively discussion covered a range of topics, from the panelists first encounters with the Internet to concrete steps for breaking out of information echo chambers. There was a series of informal conversations during the afternoon, led by Interference Archive, AfroCROWD and The Black Lunch Table, and Maryland Institute College of Art Digital Initiatives Librarian Jenny Ferretti and Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture Reference Librarian and Archivist Alexsandra Mitchell, and a collectively run working group on power structures in notability guidelines on Wikipedia.

The 2017 Art+Feminism Edit-a-thon grew in complexity and geographic scope. First time organizing institutions included Open Foundation West Africa in collaboration with African Women Development Fund, Accra; Spelman College, Atlanta; Transgender Europe in collaboration with Artists Without a Cause and Room 4 Resistance, Berlin; Griffith University, Brisbane; Bryn Mawr College; Government Museum and Art Gallery, Chandigarh; Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit; National University of Ireland, Galway; Women’s Library and Information Centre Foundation, Istanbul; Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles; Oslo National Academy of the Arts; Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, Montréal; PLATFORM, Munich; University of Nigeria, Nsukka; Parsons Paris; Maus Hábitos, Porto; Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Puerto Rico, San Juan; The Royal Armoury, Stockholm; Gardiner Museum, Toronto; and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC. Organizers in Geneva, Switzerland coordinated city-wide edit-a-thons at Centre de la photographie, Lestime, Musée d’art et d’histoire de Genève, Pavillon bleu and l’Université de Genève. For the first time edit-a-thons were held across Italy at the Uffizi Gallery, Florence; BASE Milano; Museo Archeologico Provinciale, Potenza; Rome MAXXI; Artè Caffè Culturale, Salerno; and Ca’ Foscari University, Venice.

Art+Feminism is a do-it-yourself campaign to improve coverage of feminism and the arts on Wikipedia, and to encourage female editorship. Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented; in a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that fewer than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to significant gaps in content on world’s most popular online research tool. Since 2014, over 7,100 people at more than 480 events around the world have participated in Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thons, resulting in the creation and improvement of more than 11,100 articles on Wikipedia. Following the success of the inaugural event in 2014, the co-founders were named to Foreign Policy magazine’s list of 2014 Leading Global Thinkers.

The 2017 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon was organized by Art+Feminism, led by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America’s Women and Art Special Interest Group, Jacqueline Mabey/failed projects, McKensie Mack and Michael Mandiberg, in collaboration with AfroCROWD, Women in Red, the Professional Organization for Women in the Arts (POWarts) and The Museum of Modern Art and with support from Wikimedia DC, and Wikimedia NYC. Major support for the event at The Museum of Modern Art was provided by The Modern Women’s Fund. Major support for Art+Feminism is provided by the Wikimedia Foundation.

“As Wikipedia becomes increasingly influential (it is now the fifth most-visited site in the world, up from seventh in 2015) ‘absences there echo across the internet,’ said Art+Feminism. Google now pulls its biographical sidebar information from Wikipedia, as does MoMA’s online artist pages. ‘The work we are doing feels more pressing than when we started, as Wikipedia’s content is even more visible and more trusted than when we started this project.'” Artsy on Art+Feminism.

“Information activism is perhaps even more important when we’re facts are ever increasingly being thrown by the wayside. ‘While we don’t have any specific plans to address Trump’s presidency and policies, we do see our project as particularly vital at this point in history. Affirming the importance of the work of women and other marginalized communities is pivotal,’ says Siân Evans, who works as a librarian day to day.” Art+Feminism spoke with Huck‘s Marta Bausells.

‘We believe that feminism is a lens that throws all systems producing inequality into doubt, and a reflective process through which we can work to dismantle interconnected modalities of oppression,’ the group told the Observer. ‘Art is fundamental to the creation of thriving, open societies. So, too, are open access educational resources.'” The New York Observer‘s John Bonazzo covers Art+Feminism.

“There are ordinary Wikipedia-edit-a-thons, and then there is Art+Feminism, which you might call the mother of them all. What began in 2014 as a small effort to increase the visibility of women on Wikipedia has grown into a multifaceted, worldwide phenomenon that takes place every March (coinciding with Women’s History Month in the US and International Women’s Day). It’s a unique and inspiring push for digital visibility.” Jillian Steinhauer covers Art+Feminism for Hyperallergic.

FOURTH-ANNUAL EVENT TO FEATURE PANEL DISCUSSION ON INFORMATION ACTIVISM

New York City — The fourth-annual Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, an all-day event designed to generate coverage of feminism and the arts on Wikipedia and encourage female editorship, will take place on March 11, 2017 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, with hundreds of partner events around the world. Featuring tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, ongoing editing support, reference materials, childcare, and refreshments, the much-anticipated event will take place at the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Education and Research Building, 4 West 54 Street, on Saturday, March 11, 2017 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

“We’ve been deeply disturbed by the sheer amount of fake news on social media, and its possible influence on the U.S. election,” said Art+Feminism organizers Siân Evans, Jacqueline Mabey, McKensie Mack, and Michael Mandiberg. “Wikipedia is something that belongs to all of us. It’s not a privately held resource, its content isn’t motivated by the whims of any owners. When you have a government actively pushing ‘alternative facts,’ improving the reliability and completeness of Wikipedia is an important act of everyday resistance.”

To address these issues, the Edit-a-thon will feature a series of programs throughout the day. The event will launch at 10 a.m. with an expansive conversation between writer Joanne McNeil and Data & Society Research Institute Fellow Zara Rahman, moderated by Kimberly Drew (aka @museummammy), social media manager for the Metropolitan Museum of Art and creator of the Tumblr “Black Contemporary Art.” The talk will explore how to increase public awareness of reliable sources and methods for sharing difficult to access information with a broad public. Afternoon breakout groups will engage in focused discussions about related issues including intersectionality and librarianship, power structures in notability guidelines on Wikipedia, and radical archives. As well, AfroCROWD and POWarts will have tables in the Cullman Building mezzanine with their own lists of articles needing improvement. Respectively, AfroCROWD seeks to increase the number of people of the African diaspora who participate in Wikimedia projects and POWarts champions the professional lives of women in the art world.

Hundreds of events will take place at institutions across the globe. Outreach efforts in Africa and Latin America have led to events in Ghana, Nigeria, Zimbabwe, Tunisia, as well as in Argentina, Chile, Costa Rica, and Peru and others. Additionally, a number of influential art institutions will hold an Art+Feminism event for the first time, including: Mairangi Arts Centre, Auckland; MOCA Detroit; Centre de la Photographie Genève; Arsenic, Centre d’Art scénique contemporain, Lausanne; Serpentine Galleries; Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles; Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions; BASE Milano; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Maus Hábitos, Porto; Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Puerto Rico; MAXXI, Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo, Rome; Walter and McBean Galleries, San Francisco Art Institute; Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Santiago; The Royal Armoury, Stockholm; and Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC. Entering into the fourth year of the Art+Feminism project, many groups have expanded their events to include related programming. Inspired by the work of José Esteban Munoz, the edit-a-thon at Archives Nationales, Paris organized by Lafayette Anticipations features a dynamic schedule of talks and performances by artists and scholars including Vaginal Davis, Wu Tsang and Elvan Zabunyan. The Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Vancouver is situating their edit-a-thon in the context of a larger, ongoing project investigating activism, art, and archives emerging from social movements of the 1970s. Elevate Festival, Graz will include an edit-a-thon as a part of their program on political discourse and activism. And in New York, Kickstarter has partnered with The Creative Independent, NEW INC, Black Lunch Table, Pioneer Works, Rhizome and Flux Factory to host an edit-a-thon at their Greenpoint, Brooklyn headquarters.

An updating list of venues can be found on the Art+Feminism’s website: http://www.artandfeminism.org/find-an-event/

Founded in 2014 by Siân Evans, Jacqueline Mabey, Michael Mandiberg and Laurel Ptak, Art+Feminism is a do-it-yourself campaign to improve coverage of feminism and the arts on Wikipedia, and to encourage female editorship. Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented; in a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to significant gaps in content on world’s most popular online research tool. Since 2014, over 4,600 people at more than 280 events around the world have participated in Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thons, resulting in the creation and improvement of more than 4,600 articles on Wikipedia. Following the success of the inaugural event in 2014, the organizers were named to Foreign Policy magazine’s list of 2014 Leading Global Thinkers.

Supported by a $100,000 grant from the Wikimedia Foundation for 2017, Art+Feminism has expanded its leadership to be more international and inclusive. McKensie Mack joins Art+Feminism as its inaugural Program Coordinator. McKensie is a management consultant, producer, and strategist specializing in community development, anti-oppression and operational efficiency. A dynamic group of curators, art historians and experienced Wikipedians act as project Ambassadors nationally and internationally, including Mohammed Sadat Abdulai, Accra; Stacey Allan, Los Angeles; Amber Berson, Montreal; Melissa Tamani, Lima; and Richard Knipel, for the Wikipedia community. Artist Addie Wagenknecht is expanding the project’s European footprint, and Daniela Capistrano and Brittany Oliver have been engaged to facilitate outreach to queer communities and communities of color nationally.

The 2017 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon is organized by Art+Feminism, led by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America’s Women and Art Special Interest Group, Jacqueline Mabey/failed projects, McKensie Mack and Michael Mandiberg, in collaboration with AfroCROWD, Women in Red, POWarts (Professional Organization for Women in the Arts) and The Museum of Modern Art and with support from Wikimedia DC and Wikimedia NYC. Major support for the event at The Museum of Modern Art is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund. Major support for Art+Feminism is provided by the Wikimedia Foundation.

“In a statement, the organizers said, ‘Wikipedia is something that belongs to all of us. It’s not a privately held resource, its content isn’t motivated by the whims of any owners. When you have a government actively pushing ‘alternative facts,’ improving the reliability and completeness of Wikipedia is an important act of everyday resistance.'” Art+Feminism in Artforum.

“The edit-a-thon began with a restatement of the day’s main objective: to combat Wikipedia’s well-documented gender gap by improving, however incrementally, its coverage of women in the arts. In spite of the site’s ostensibly egalitarian, accessible format, more than ninety per cent of its editors are male, according to a study conducted in 2011 by the Wikimedia Foundation.” Talia Lavin covers Art+Feminism for The New Yorker.

MARK SUCCESS OF ART+FEMINISM’S 2016 WIKIPEDIA EDIT-A-THON

New York City — Over 2500 participants at more than 175 events around the world participated in Art+Feminism’s third annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, resulting in the creation of 2000 new pages and improvements to 1500 articles on Wikipedia. This represents a significant increase over the 2015 events, with more than double the number of participants and triple the number of articles created or improved. Organized around Women’s History Month, the Edit-a-thon was designed to generate coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia and encourage female editorship — a response to the well-known gender gap on Wikipedia.

Alongside the central event at The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the 175+ events were held across every inhabited continent and in 30 countries at venues including: Ashesi University Brekuso, Accra; Tate Britain, London; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo, Mexico City; Gus Fisher Gallery, The University of Auckland; Archives Nationales, Paris; The Menil Collection, Houston; SCAD Hong Kong; Espacio Fundación Telefónica, Lima; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC.; and a month-long online edit-a-thon hosted by Women In Red. As of this writing an additional 10+ events are scheduled for later in April.

Highlights of the 2016 Edit-a-thon include new Wikipedia pages for Unity Bainbridge, Manon de Boer, Tina Charlie, Otelia Cromwell, Aurora Reyes Flores, Liz Magic Laser, Park McArthur, Elizabeth McIntosh, Divya Mehra, Anne Pasternak, and Sara Greenberger Rafferty and improved articles for Megumi Igarashi, Julie Mehretu, Ana Mendieta, Wangechi Mutu, Lorraine O’Grady, Porpentine, Faith Ringgold, Martine Sims, Carrie Mae Weems, and Zitkala-Sa. Detailed results for many of the global events are being catalogued on Wikipedia on an ongoing basis, viewable on our 2016 Outcomes page.

In New York, the Edit-a-thon featured an expansive conversation on contemporary feminisms and digital culture with writer Orit Gat, artist and activist Reina Gossett, and New York Times technology columnist Jenna Wortham, moderated by Fiona Romeo, MoMA’s Director of Digital Content and Strategy and afternoon breakout groups about related issues, including intellectual property, notability, and LGBTQ visibility on Wikipedia. In Paris, 600 participants convened for two days of long table conversation and editing at the Archives Nationales. And in València, the City Councilor in charge of gender equality, Isabel Lozano, attended and edited.

 

Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented; in a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to an alarming dearth of content about women and art in the world’s most popular online research tool. Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thon impacts the gender gap through crucial improvements to art and feminism related subjects on Wikipedia. In 2014, the Art+Feminism organizers were named to Foreign Policy magazine’s list of Leading Global Thinkers.

The 2016 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon was organized by Art+Feminism, led by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America’s Women and Art Special Interest Group, Jacqueline Mabey/failed projects, and Michael Mandiberg, in collaboration with the Professional Organization for Women in the Arts (POWarts) and The Museum of Modern Art, with support from Tekserve, Wikimedia NYC and the Wikimedia Foundation.

THIRD-ANNUAL EVENT TO FEATURE PANEL DISCUSSION ON CONTEMPORARY FEMINISM

New York City — Art+Feminism’s third annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, an all-day event designed to generate coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia and encourage female editorship, will take place on March 5, 2016 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Featuring tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, ongoing editing support, reference materials, childcare, and refreshments, the much-anticipated event will take place at the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Education and Research Building, 4 West 54 Street, on March 5, 2016 from from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Edit-a-thon will launch at 10 a.m. with an expansive conversation on contemporary feminisms and digital culture with writer Orit Gat, artist and activist Reina Gossett, and New York Times technology columnist Jenna Wortham, moderated by Fiona Romeo, MoMA’s Director of Digital Content and Strategy. Continuing this discussion, afternoon breakout groups will engage in focused conversations about related issues, including intellectual property, notability, and LGBTQ visibility on Wikipedia.

Node edit-a-thons will take place in the month of March at over 125 venues in over 20 countries on every inhabited continent, including Ashesi University Brekuso, Accra; Tate Britain, London; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo, Mexico City; Gus Fisher Gallery, The University of Auckland; Archives Nationales, Paris; The Menil Collection, Houston; SCAD Hong Kong; Espacio Fundación Telefónica, Lima; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; and the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC.

“Our focus this year is intersectional feminisms,” said the lead co-organizers, Siân Evans, Jacqueline Mabey and Michael Mandiberg. “Feminism is not just an idea, but a practice: a way of organizing that is inclusive, collaborative, horizontal, with consensus-based decision making. With this in mind, we have convened a group of experienced community organizers to review our materials and methods. Their findings will shape the form of our materials going forward. We did this to better serve Art+Feminism participants, and to create a welcoming space for all members of the public who wish to participate.”

In March 2015, over 1,500 participants joined Art+Feminism’s second annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon at The Museum of Modern Art in New York and more than 75 satellite events around the world, resulting in the creation of nearly 400 new pages and significant improvements to 500 articles on Wikipedia—including articles about female artists, feminist artistic movements, and feminist scholarship. Following the success of the inaugural event in 2014, the organizers were named to Foreign Policy magazine’s list of 2014 Leading Global Thinkers.

Art+Feminism is a rhizomatic campaign to improve coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia, and to encourage female editorship. Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented; in a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to an alarming dearth of content about women and art in the world’s most popular online research tool. Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thons and other initiatives make an impact on the gender gap through crucial improvements to art and feminism related subjects on Wikipedia. To facilitate the expansion of Art+Feminism in 2016, the Wikimedia Foundation has renewed their support with a $56,000 grant, supplementing $25,000 in previous funding.

Node edit-a-thons are being planned for the month of March at over 125 venues across every inhabited continent, including: National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth; Ashesi University, Accra; Gus Fisher Gallery, The University of Auckland; The Banff Centre; Kaskadenkondensator, Basel; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; Interference Archive, Brooklyn; Massachusetts Institute of Technology Libraries, Cambridge; Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town; School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh; SCAD Hong Kong; The Menil Collection, Houston; Cornell University, Ithaca; Baexong Arts Kyoto; Espacio Fundación Telefónica, Lima; Kunsthaus Hafenstraße, Linz; Institute of Contemporary Arts, London; Tate Britain, London; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; México, Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo (UNAM), Alumnos 47, and Centro de Cultura Digital Estela de Luz, Mexico City; Canadian Women Art History Initiative, Concordia University, Montréal; McGill, Montréal; Yale University, New Haven; Newcomb Art Museum, Tulane University, New Orleans; Smith College, Northampton; Archives Nationales, Paris; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh; Yale Union, Portland; Rhode Island School of Design, Providence; California College of the Arts, San Francisco; New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe; Savannah College of Art and Design; Hallwylska museet, Stockholm; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Bibliothèque diocésaine de Tunis; Biblioteca Municipal Carmelina Sánchez-Cutillas, Valencia; Emily Carr University of Art and Design, The University of British Columbia, and Western Front, Vancouver; The Pennsylvania State University, University Park; Rose Art Museum and Rosebud, Brandeis University, Waltham; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C.; and online all month long as part of the Women in Red edit-a-thon. The complete list of venues can be found on the Art+Feminism meet up page.

The 2016 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon is organized by Art+Feminism, led by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America’s Women and Art Special Interest Group, Jacqueline Mabey/failed projects, and Michael Mandiberg, in collaboration with the Professional Organization for Women in the Arts (POWarts) and The Museum of Modern Art, with support from Tekserve, Wikimedia NYC and the Wikimedia Foundation.

“The under-representation of women is not a product of the digital age and the predominantly male editorship of Wikipedia—which we’ll return to shortly; the digital age is merely, in its current state, a continuation of how things have always been. In the past this dearth has certainly been documented, as Virginia Woolf said, with more bitter resignation to the fact, ‘anonymous was a woman.'” Artslant on the 3rd annual Art+Feminism Edit-a-thon.

New York City — Over 1500 participants at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and at more than 75 satellite events around the world participated in Art+Feminism’s second annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, resulting in the creation of nearly 400 new pages and significant improvements to 500 articles on Wikipedia. Organized around International Women’s Day, the Edit-a-thon was designed to generate coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia and encourage female editorship — a response to the well-known gender gap on Wikipedia. In addition to the New York hub at The Museum of Modern Art, where 200 people gathered, events were held across the U.S. and in 17 countries around the globe at venues including the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Sonntags Club, Berlin; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; The Dowse Art Museum, New Zealand; Fondation Galeries Lafayette, Paris; and Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto.

Highlights of the 2015 Edit-a-thon include new Wikipedia pages for Elise Forrest Harleston, Amy Maria Sacker, Janet Payne Bowles, Lisl Steiner, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Kali, Betty G. Miller, Camille Henrot, Sarah McEneaney, Kyle DeWoody, Jennie C. Jones, and the Heresies Collective and improved articles for Cecily Brown, Elaine de Kooning, Evelyn De Morgan, Carol Shaw, Coco Fusco, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Valerie Hegarty, Yael Bartana, and Augusta Savage. Detailed results for many of the global events are being catalogued on Wikipedia on an ongoing basis (http://bit.ly/2015Outcomes).

Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented; in a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to an alarming dearth of content about women and art in the world’s most popular online research tool. Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thon impacts the gender gap through crucial improvements to art and feminism related subjects on Wikipedia. In 2014, the Art+Feminism organizers were named to Foreign Policy magazine’s list of Leading Global Thinkers.

The 2015 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon was organized by Art+Feminism, led by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America’s Women and Art Special Interest Group, Dorothy Howard, Jacqueline Mabey/failed projects, and Michael Mandiberg, in collaboration with the Professional Organization for Women in the Arts (POWarts) and The Museum of Modern Art, and with support from Tekserve and Wikimedia NYC.

“Some form of arts. Siân Evans and I met at McGill University, where we both studied art history. Michael Mandiberg is an artist and a professor. We’ve always said that this is an intervention as feminists but also as artists, art workers, art historians, and art librarians. The content on Wikipedia about the arts isn’t great, and it’s worth standing up and saying that women’s work matters, but art also matters.” Artnews covers the edit-a-thon at MoMA.

“On Saturday, in a quiet room overlooking the snowy sculpture garden at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, Jon Liechty was trying to translate the Wikipedia entry for the feminist artist Judy Chicago into Esperanto, an artificial language invented in 1887.” The Wall Street Journal‘s Anna Russell reporting from MoMA.

“Last year’s event, which drew participants in six countries, resulted in more 100 new articles on female artists, feminist artistic movements and feminist scholarship and improvements to more than 90 articles, according to a news release. And there are signs that similar efforts across other topic areas may be having a broad effect.” Jennifer Schuessler covers Art+Feminism for The New York Times.

New York Event Set to Take Place at the Museum of Modern Art with Over 55 Satellite Events Around the World

New York City — Art+Feminism is pleased to announce its second annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, an all-day event  designed to generate coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia and encourage female editorship. The event will take place at The Museum of Modern Art on Saturday, March 7, 2015 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m and include tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, ongoing Wikipedia support, reference materials, childcare, and refreshments. Satellite edit-a-thons will be held over International Women’s Day weekend (March 6-8) in over 55 venues across the U.S. and around the world, including the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Sonntags Club, Berlin; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; The Dowse Art Museum, New Zealand; Fondation Galeries Lafayette, Paris; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; and online in a Google Hangout.

Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented; in a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to an alarming dearth of content about women and art in the world’s most popular online research tool. Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thon will make an impact on the gender gap through crucial improvements to art and feminism related subjects on Wikipedia.

In February 2014, 600 participants convened in 31 locations across six countries for Art+Feminism’s first Wikipedia Edit-a-thon. Over the course of the day, over 100 new articles were created, and at least 90 improved–including articles about female artists, feminist artistic movements, and feminist scholarship. Following the success of the event, the organizers were named to Foreign Policy magazine’s 2014 list of Leading Global Thinkers.

The headquarters for Art+Feminism’s Second Annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon is The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Education and Research Building at The Museum of Modern Art, 4 West 54 Street. The event will be held on Saturday, March 7, 2015 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The 2015 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon is organized by Art+Feminism, led by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America’s Women and Art Special Interest Group, Dorothy Howard, Jacqueline Mabey/failed projects, and Michael Mandiberg, in collaboration with the Professional Organization for Women in the Arts (POWarts) and The Museum of Modern Art.

Over 55 satellite edit-a-thons will take place across 11 countries over International Women’s Day weekend, March 6-8, 2015. Confirmed hosts include: Main Library, University of Georgia, Athens; Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives, The Banff Centre; School of Information, University of Texas at Austin; Sonntags Club, Berlin; Indiana University Bloomington; Morton R Godine Library at The Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Boston; Brooklyn Museum; F/LAT, Brussels; John M. Flaxman Library, School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Kelvin Smith Library, Case Western Reserve, Cleveland; Den Frie Udstillingsbygning, Copenhagen; Hannah Maclure Centre, University of Abertay, Dundee; Mercury Studio, Durham, NC; Central Washington University, Ellensburg; NYU Florence; Fresno Art Museum; NSCAD University Library, Halifax; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; The University of California, Irvine; University of Kentucky, Lexington; Los Angeles County Museum of Art in collaboration with East of Borneo and Women’s Center for Creative Work; The Dowse Art Museum, Lower Hutt, New Zealand; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Canadian Women’s Art History Initiative, Concordia University and Eastern Bloc, Montreal; Monongalia Art Center, Morgantown, WV; Vera Ermolaeva Foundation, Moscow; Stedelijk Museum and the Bonnefanten Museum, The Netherlands; Newcomb College Institute, New Orleans; State University of New York at New Paltz; Babycastles Gallery, New York City; University of Notre Dame; California College of the Arts, Oakland; Fondation Galeries Lafayette, Paris; Artspace, Peterborough, ON; Albert M. Greenfield Library at University of the Arts, Philadelphia; 76<100, Pittsburgh; California State Polytechnic University, Pomona; Crumpacker Family Library, Portland Art Museum; Rhode Island School of Design, Providence; State University of New York at Purchase; The University of California, San Diego; Kadist Art Foundation, San Francisco; The University of California, Santa Barbara; Pennsylvania State University, State College; Sweet Briar College; Edward P. Taylor Library & Archives at Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver; The Hepworth, Wakefield; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C.; Wardman Library, Whittier College; The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art, Winnipeg; College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA; and online in a Google Hangout with Addie Wagenknecht, with more in development.

“But unlike other spaces where women are underrepresented, Wikipedia doesn’t have any official gatekeeper excluding us. No one hires you to edit Wikipedia. Which means it’s the kind of thing you can’t really complain about unless you do your part.” Kat Stoeffel reporting from the scene at Eyebeam for New York Magazine.

“By the end of the day, around 100 new entries were up (around 80 more were enhanced). The new pages, devoted to figures ranging from Australian modernists Ethel Spowers and Dorrit Black to Catalan painter Josefa Texidor i Torres to contemporary artists including Mary MissXaviera SimmonsAudrey Flack, and Monika Bravo, vary widely in scope, grammar, and quality of content. But the Wikipedia team expects that blips will vanish as the hive mind has its work on the entries.” Artnews‘ Robin Cembalest on the 101 Wikipedia articles create by Art+Feminism participants.

“Artist Karen Adelman attended one of the MAK Center edit-a-thons, and felt invigorated by it. ‘I worry about the culture of oversharing that the Internet has cultivated, and yet also clamor constantly for more valid representations of diversity,’ she says. ‘I think an event like this one offers a dynamic solution: a real life, in-person gathering of actual people and their bodies.'” Catherine Wagley covers the LA edit-a-thons in LA Weekly.

“Next week, groups of artists and tech-savvy folks around the country are taking aim at gender imbalance in the representation of female artists on Wikipedia. The “Art + Feminism Edit-a-Thon” being held in New York on February 1st has inspired simultaneous editing marathons in 17 other cities, all focused on adding more female artists to the public encyclopedia and fleshing out the meager entries of existing women artists.” Sarah Mirk covers Art+Feminism in Bitch Magazine

Wikipedia’s content and community skews male, creating significant gaps in an increasingly important repository of shared knowledge. We invite you to address this absence in an all-day, communal updating of Wikipedia’s entries on contemporary art and feminism. There will be tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, digital and print materials to reference, childcare for the little ones, and light refreshments provided. Attendees are encouraged to edit any entry of interest related to art, feminism, gender studies, and LGBTQ issues. All are welcome: women, woman-identified, queer, and their allies.

Not in New York? Multiple satellite edit-a-thons will also happen simultaneously across North America and online. Confirmed events will take place at: Flinders University in Adelaide, Australia; De Appel in Amsterdam, The Netherlands; University of Texas at Austin School of Information; School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, MA; Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum (co-hosted by Project Continua); Parmer in Brooklyn (by invite only); Luke Lindoe Library at the Alberta College of Art and Design in Calgary, Canada; School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design in Dundee, UK: Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University; NSCAD University Library in Halifax, Canada; University of Hong Kong; University of Iowa Center for the Book in Iowa City, IA; Women’s Studio Workshop in Kingston, NY; School of Art and Design at Middlesex University, London; n.paradoxa in London (by invite only); The Public School in Los Angeles; University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Library & Information Studies; Eastern Bloc (co-hosted by Eastern Bloc, Studio XX, revue .dpi, and Skol) in Montreal, Canada; University of the Arts Greenfield Library in Philadelphia, PA; Portland State University; State University of New York at Purchase; CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco; Art Metropole in Toronto, Canada; Seattle Attic Community Workshop; National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, DC; and more locations to be announced.

For those looking to start editing early, try this tutorial (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Training/For_students) and sign in to the event (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Meetup/ArtAndFeminism#Confirmed_NYC_attendees). Childcare at the New York event requires advanced RSVP; please contact us at artandfeminismwiki@gmail.com to let us know the number of children requiring care, their ages, and what time you will be attending. If you would like to host an Edit-a-Thon, please join in. If you are looking for training materials or have questions, post on the talk page or contact the organizers at artandfeminismwiki@gmail.com.

Eyebeam is an art and technology center that provides a fertile context and state-of-the-art tools for digital research and experimentation. It is a lively incubator of creativity and thought, where artists and technologists actively engage with culture, addressing the issues and concerns of our time. Eyebeam challenges convention, celebrates the hack, educates the next generation, encourages collaboration, freely offers its contributions to the community, and invites the public to share in a spirit of openness: open source, open content, and open distribution.

Organized by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America’s Women and Art Special Interest Group, Jacqueline Mabey/The office of failed projects, Michael Mandiberg, and Laurel Ptak/Eyebeam Fellow, and Richard Knipel and Dorothy Howard (Metropolitan New York Library Council) of Wikimedia NYC.