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We are so excited to introduce you to our expanded team: 1 new lead co-organizer in Peru and 13 Regional Ambassadors all over the world, from Arizona to Ghana to Taiwan. Each of these organizers brings experience in Wikipedia editing, social justice-oriented work, arts administration, and community organizing to their new role. We’re so inspired by their work, already! Please take a moment to read their biographies below.

Lead Co-Organizer Melissa Tamani Becerra, Lima, Peru

Melissa Tamani Becerra (Lima, 1991) is an art historian, cultural manager, and museum educator. The axes of her work are the empowerment of marginalized communities, the promotion of culture as a catalyst for social mobilization and the dissemination of the cultural production of Latin American women. She has been part of Art+Feminism since 2015, initially as organizer of Art+Feminism editathons in Lima (5 to date) and, since 2017, as Regional Ambassador in Latin America, a position in which she had the opportunity to contribute to the expansion of Art+Feminism editathons throughout the region. As co-leader organizer of Art+Feminism she hopes to consolidate the growth of the campaign in the global south through the creation of new leaders belonging to underrepresented communities within the Wikimedia movement, on and offline. She is currently working as Assistant of the Educational Program of the cultural center focused on contemporary art and digital culture Espacio Fundación Telefónica in Lima. She is also a promoter of Wikimedia culture in Peru, organizing and taking part in campaigns and editathons about feminism, human rights, and ecology.

Walaa Abdel Anaem Ruby Mizrahi CC 3.0 license

Regional Ambassador Walaa Abdel Manaem, Egypt

Walaa Abdel Manaem, Assistant Lecturer at Cairo University; Admin and editor on Arabic Wikipedia; Co- founder of Egypt Wikimedians User Group; Organizer of Inter WikiWomen Collaboration for Arab World (2018); Organizer of Art+Feminism contest for Arab World (2018); Co-Organizer of WikiGap/Cairo (2018); Co-organizer of WikiAarabia Egypt (2017), Organizer of WikiWomen Prize (2015-2016); Wikipedia Education Program Leader (WEP) at Cairo, Al-Azhar, Aswan Minya, South Valley, Mansoura, Kafr El Sheikh,Tanta, Damietta, Zagazig, Alexandria, Suez Canal & Ain Shams Universities for more than 6 years and active member of Wikipedia Education Collaborative (Collab), known now as Wikipedia & Education User Group, as one of the few program leaders who mentor other programs around the world. I’m part of the Movement Strategy Working Group for Diversity. I’m mentioned in the Faces from the Wikimedia Movement.

Regional Ambassador Dominique Eliane, Ivory Coast

With a degree in Communications, I am passionate about ICT, media and journalism, and all having to do with Wikipedia. I joined the Wikimedia Ivory Coast community in 2014. Since then, I have been an active member of the User Group as an auditor in the executive office and the head of some projects including the Wiki Loves Women project run between 2016 and 2017. Since 2017, I’ve been the head of the Wikimousso pole, a group dedicated to the engagement of women in my community and whose goal is to reduce the gender gap through the production of content on Ivorian women. Working with the A + F team is an opportunity that will allow me to continue in the same vein with even more content on women in the field of art, through the organization of workshops, edit-athons, and other activities.

Regional Ambassador Amanda Meeks, Arizona

Amanda Meeks is a Teaching, Learning, and Research Services Librarian in Arizona, an artist, and a feminist. Through working with Art+Feminism, she is looking forward to pushing herself, and her profession, to intentionally reflect on power, privilege, intersecting identities and implicit biases that shape our collective knowledge, via Wikipedia. She’s excited to bring fellow community members and regional information activists together and work through an intersectional lens to amplify underrepresented, radical and marginalized voices within the arts.

Regional Ambassador Juliana Monteiro, São Paulo, Brazil

I am a freelancer museologist and a teacher of Museology at a public technical school in São Paulo, Brazil, where I live. I have been working with museums for 10 years, mostly with collection management projects. I took my first steps in the open access and Wikimedia world in 2016, during a GLAM Wiki project realised by Museu da Imigração de São Paulo [Immigration Museum of São Paulo], where I used to work. After that, I became more and more engaged in advocating in favour of Wikimedia projects within Brazilian GLAM sector. As women are the majority of Brazilian GLAM professionals, it was a natural move for me to start participating in actions focused on reducing the gender gap that we have in this area. What I hope to accomplish in 2019 with Art+Feminism is to help increase the number of female editors in Wikimedia projects. And I also expect to help to build a safe environment for all the women that want to start editing or just want to know more about Art + Feminism is. Last, I really want to learn a lot about all the participants that I have the chance to meet in person or online.

Regional Ambassador Linden How, Portland, OR

Linden How is a visual artist and art librarian in Portland, OR. She loves supporting art students and practitioners in expanding and defining the unique ways they research and contribute their voices to various discourses. She’s a huge believer in working to address the lack of representation of women, LGBTQ+, and POC artists, histories, and narratives on Wikipedia and elsewhere, so that they are made visible and available to emerging artists and designers as they shape their awareness of art, its roles in the world, and their approaches to their own practices. It’s for these reasons that she’s very honored to join the Art+Feminism team as a Regional Ambassador this year.

Regional Ambassador Jessie Mi, Taiwan

My name is Jessie, I am the first Wikiwomen organizer in Taiwan. I joined the Art+Feminism project as an editor three years ago and I hope that every East Asian country can join this project~^^

Regional Ambassador Taryn Tomasello, Portland, Oregon

Regional Ambassador Taryn Tomasello is an artist, organizer, curator, and mother based in Portland, Oregon. She describes the relationship between the various roles she takes on as a nested practice, where the work of curator and organizer can be found nestled inside the work of motherhood and artist, or vice versa. For the past 3 years she has organized Art + Feminism node events in the Portland area.

Regional Ambassador Medhavi Gandhi, Chandigarh, India

“An award-winning cultural practitioner, Medhavi has been widely recognised for her innovative approach to public engagement with Indian art, especially the youth. She has led several arts-based programs, and curated inter-country artist exchanges at Happy Hands Foundation before starting up theheritagelab.in where she brings together her love for museums, and arts-education, providing a platform for educators, parents and travellers to explore India’s heritage, art, history & museums.”
Here’s what I hope to achieve for Art+Feminism this year:
Leading Art+Feminism events in India with museums has been such an enriching experience so far. Going ahead, I’d definitely like to increase training opportunities for museums so they are able to host and organise events independently. At all museums that we hosted the event, there are staff members who learnt to edit Wikipedia and I look forward to support and build capacity of editors – at least within the arts community! I’ve been able to connect with Punjabi, Marathi and Bengali Wikipedia, and would like to extend partnerships with them to locally host Art+Feminism events. Last year, Marathi Wikipedia expressed interest and am sure we’d be able to similarly engage with other regional Wiki chapters to further the scope of A+F in India.

Regional Ambssador Amber Berson, Canada

Amber Berson is a writer, curator, and PhD candidate conducting doctoral research at Queen’s University on artist-run culture and feminist, utopian thinking. She most recently curated Utopia as Method (2018); World Cup! (2018); The Let Down Reflex (2016-2018, with Juliana Driever); TrailMix (2014, with Eliane Ellbogen); *~._.:*JENNIFER X JENNIFER*:.~ (2013, with Eliane Ellbogen); The Annual Art Administrator’s Relay Race (2013, with Nicole Burisch); The Wild Bush Residency (2012–14); and was the 2016 curator-in-residence as part of the France-Quebec Cross-Residencies at Astérides in Marseille, France. She is the Canadian ambassador for the Art+Feminism Wikipedia project. Her writing has been published in Breach Magazine, Canadian Art, C Magazine, Revue .dpi, Esse, Fuse Magazine, Le Merle and the St Andrews Journal of Art History and Museum Studies amongst others.

Regional Ambassador Daniela Brugger, Switzerland

Daniela Brugger is an artist based in Switzerland and started with the collaborative writing project Who writes his_tory? in 2016, inspired by Art+Feminism. Since then she organized several Edit-a-thons in collaboration with art and project spaces, art schools, archives and libraries, mainly in the German speaking parts of Europe. Now she’s looking forward to expand her network within the global community and to extend the collective structure.

Regional Ambassador Mohammed Sadat Abdulai, Accra, Ghana

My name is Mohammed. I was born and grew up in Tamale but I now live in Accra, the capital city of Ghana. I’m a longtime Wikipedia editor who goes by the username Masssly. I’m passionate about open knowledge and so I’m really proud of what we do on Wikipedia to make information freely and easily accessible to everyone.
I’m involved a variety of groups and volunteer causes that directly serve the Wikimedia community including the Wikimedia Board Election Committee, Wikimedia Research Newsletter and the Wikimedia Foundation Volunteer Response Team. Among my major interests on the encyclopedia is finding solutions to reducing Wikipedia’s gender gap problem. I’ve engaged in many gender-based outreach activities in West Africa, and in 2014 I was the lead researcher for the Wikidata Human Gender Indicators project that developed and automated the production and graphing of statistics about gender diversity in Wikipedia projects in a publicly viewable website with open-data downloads. I’m also generally interested in the topic of non-participation from the Global South and recruitment of new Wikipedia contributors.
In my free time, when I’m not working on gender gap or researching non-participation on Wikipedia, you would most likely find me trying out new recipes to prepare kelewele, a delicacy that I find hard to resist every time.

Regional Ambassador Stacey Allan, Los Angeles, California

Stacey Allan is a Los Angeles–based writer, editor, and art book publisher. She is cofounder of East of Borneo, an online magazine of West Coast contemporary art and its history, and ambassador to Art + Feminism since 2014.

image credit: Mahala Nuuk

Regional Ambassador Marta Delatte, Barcelona, Spain

Marta Delatte (1982) is an Internet researcher, journalist and maker. Graduated in Journalism (URL), she continued her education with a PgDip in Cultural Management (URL), and later on, with a Masters Degree in Music as Interdisciplinary Art (UB). She is currently completing her PhD in Digital Memory at the University of Hull as a member of the Media and Memory Research Initiative, a centre of excellence for research on the collection, preservation, interpretation, and dissemination of mediated memories, especially those that may be vulnerable due to institutional neglect or association with emerging areas of interest. She is also a contributing writer for VICE, The Creators Projects and Broadly en Español and her film essays and multimedia artwork, mainly based on found-footage narrative, has been shown in Barcelona, Madrid, Wien, New York, Sarajevo and Hanoi.

Art+Feminism is looking for a Community Fellow and a Communications Fellow. Spread the word!

Art+Feminism is pleased to announce that McKensie Mack has been appointed Director. Mack (pronouns: they/them) was brought on as Program Coordinator in 2017, to support the exponential growth of the global initiative. “McKensie quickly made themselves invaluable, revitalizing our core leadership group with new ideas and insights into existing processes,” said Art+Feminism co-founders Siân EvansJacqueline Mabey, and Michael Mandiberg. “They’ve facilitated the growth of the project in Latinx countries and fundamentally changed the scope of the project. In advance of becoming a non-profit, the choice of Director was clear.”

Of the appointment, Mack said, “I am honored and ready to be named the Director of Art+Feminism. During my tenure, I will work to expand our global community focusing specifically on West Africa, Asia, and South America in addition to developing new partnerships in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom with local communities who are willing and ready to shift culture and establish new pipelines for accountability, trust, and partnership through history written, edited, and preserved by marginalized people about marginalized people.”

Mack’s goals for the project are informed by their ethos: “I believe in Black and brown people. I believe in women and their power. I believe in the liberation of LGBTQ communities. I believe in the power present in each and every one of us, regardless of our varied interactions of identity – to do our own work so that we may not ask but demand and take our power back. That’s why I joined Art+Feminism two years ago, because of those beliefs; beliefs which I carry with me every day. Our history matters; now, let’s go tell it.”

McKensie Mack is an anti-oppression consultant, performance artist, and writer leveraging the reach of pop culture and satire to envision a world without white supremacy and genderphobia. Their body of work challenges the marginalization of Black and brown, women, queer and trans folks as a “normal” part of our everyday lives. Mack uses the examination of history, the irony of pop culture, and the absurdity of normalized implicit and explicit biases to facilitate difficult conversation about gender and race. Mack is a University of Chicago graduate and a linguist who is fluent in three languages. Mack hails from Mississippi but is now based in Chicago, and on any given weekday, they can be heard twirling while saying “I am amazing. I am a masterpiece.”

Founded in 2014 by Siân Evans, Jacqueline Mabey, Michael Mandiberg, and Laurel Ptak, Art+Feminism is an international activism platform intended to improve coverage of gender, feminism, and the arts on Wikipedia. Approximately 16% of editors globally identify as women and this lack of participation has led to significant gaps in content on the world’s most popular online research tool. Since 2014, over 10,000 people at more than 800 events around the world have participated in Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thons, resulting in the creation and improvement of more than 33,000 articles on Wikipedia. The project has expanded to include an art commissioning program, curatorial collaborations, and a podcast. Foreign Policy Magazine named the founders Leading Global Thinkers and Art+Feminism has been covered widely in the press. Art+Feminism is based out of The Museum of Modern Art, New York, with nodes at the Center for Curatorial Studies Library, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson; ICA Boston; National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin; Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven; Uffizi Gallery, Florence; Asia Art Archive & M+, Hong Kong; The Menil Collection, Houston; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Lenbachhaus München; Yale University, New Haven; University of Nigeria, Nsukka; Princeton University; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Santiago; Index – The Swedish Contemporary Art Foundation, Stockholm; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC, and hundreds of other locations.

Art+Feminism is please to announce its participation in the This Site is Under Revolution at the Moscow Museum of Modern Art, as a part of the Moscow Biennale for Young Art. Full details below.

Gramsci said, “We resist when we recognize the arbitrary foundations of a rule.” But what could be the virtual shape of resistance in times of digital oligarchies? How can we protest against biased systems and unfair monitoring? What could be considered violence in digital terms? Our voices seem deprived of resonance in the virtual realm, consumed and diluted in the never-ending thread of images and data. We have become mere visitors of our own experiences and data providers for corporations. Although aggressions in the digital sphere are obvious, they remain masked under the discourses of democratization, protection of and free access to information.

To fight against the oppressive yet fluid and immaterial system, This site is under Revolution looks for tools of empowerment, mechanisms of distraction, and schemes to regain agency. It focuses on how artists disentangle the social, cultural, historical, gendered implications of identity in the post-digital society, and explore the virtual sphere as the terrain to trigger civil transgression.

Through a selection of works that move across media – from sound to performance, from digital to print – the exhibition explores the power of minimal gestures to critique and challenge uneven ways of representation that perpetuate dominant conventions. The artists embrace their inherent vulnerability, subverting the discourse of protection and paternalism, and to transform it into political agency. They adamantly depict the un-representedness to overturn the current situation of partisanship and distrust, whether by means of speculation, by delving into the politics of knowledge dissemination, or by decoding and confronting the viewer with the tacit rules that generate structures of inclusion and exclusion.

This site is under Revolution transforms the museum into an agent, and the exhibition into a live scenario – expanding its limits with discursive events such as workshops, discussions and performances, both online and offline. The exhibition takes place at MMOMA at the Gogolevsky Boulevard, where The Decemberist planned their uprising against the Tsar, continues in the digital realm through the platform CosmosCarl.co.uk, and uses the digital vocabulary to plot strategies of post-digital resistance on its vernacular.

In this way, it delves into the politics and poetics of representation and identity in the post-digital society. Thus facilitating new ways of engaging with our realities beyond the Eurocentric, accelerated views of the present, and looking at them refracted through prisms of disparity, empowerment, and agency.

22,000 PAGES CREATED OR IMPROVED BY OVER 4,000 PARTICIPANTS
AT MORE THAN 275 EVENTS
AROUND THE WORLD
MARK SUCCESS OF ART+FEMINISM’S
FIFTH ANNUAL WIKIPEDIA EDIT-A-THON

ORGANIZERS ALSO DEBUT
NEW WIKIDATA PROJECT

New York City — Over 4,000 people at more than 275 events around the world participated in Art+Feminism’s fifth annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, which took place across the months of March and April. This global effort created or improved nearly 22,000 articles on Wikipedia, almost four times the output of the 2017 events. The goal of the Edit-a-thon series is to bolster coverage of feminism, gender, and the arts on Wikipedia — a response to the encyclopedia’s well-known content gaps.

Highlights of the 2018 Edit-a-thon include content added to and pages created for notable figures including Christina BattleAlexandra BellTorkwase DysonSilvia FedericiDara FriedmanJuliana HuxtableGertrude JekyllChō KōranGriselda PollockAnnie PootoogookCollier SchorrTschabalala SelfRoberta SmithNobuko Tsuchiuraand Sam Vernon.

“The impetus for Art+Feminism was absence,” said lead organizers Siân Evans, Jacqueline Mabey, McKensie Mack, and Michael Mandiberg. “That first year, Art+Feminism participants rose to the challenge, creating pages for artists like Simone LeighSenga NengudiLisa OppenheimJoan SemmelZarina, and so many more. Over the last four years, participants have steadily improved many of these pages, and we’ve seen articles that began as short paragraphs expanded into substantive texts.”

“As we have addressed many of these glaring omissions, we have seen our focus turn towards improving existing articles: for example, the first year we created 101 new articles, and improved roughly the same number, while this year we improved 7 times as many articles as we created. Our task is to take what we’ve made to the next level.” To that end, Art+Feminism’s Michael Mandiberg and Danara Sarıoğlu have developed Wikidata QuickSheets, a tool that helps us identify, track, sort and improve articles created and expanded at Art+Feminism events.

At The Museum of Modern Art, the Edit-a-thon kicked off with “Careful with Each Other, Dangerous Together,” a conversation between Salome Asega, artist and researcher; Sydette Harry, Editor, Mozilla Foundation, and Editor-at-Large, Coral Project; and Sarah Jaffe, Reporting Fellow, the Nation Institute, and author of Necessary Trouble: Americans in Revolt, and moderated by design researcher and artist Caroline Sinders. The wide-ranging conversation covered the substantial work required to do community organizing, self-care, and challenged notions that solidarity requires us all to get along. The spirit of the conversation can best be summed up in a quote from Sydette Harry: “How we go through the world commits violence and hierarchy among people, but we still have to do the work. We still have to do articles, we still have to change, with the idea that we are going towards a system that will someday imagine something better.” During the afternoon, Shelly Eversley spoke about her experiences using Wikipedia in the classroom and Kerry Downey led two gallery sessions exploring feminist art on view at The Museum of Modern Art. Art+Feminism’s McKensie Mack led a training on combating implicit and explicit bias.

New York City played host to over 20 Art+Feminism-related events to celebrate the fifth year of Art+Feminism. Bard Graduate CenterBarnard CollegeBlack Lunch Table x Triangle Art AssociationColumbia UniversityThe CUNY Graduate CenterInterference ArchiveThe Jewish MuseumKickstarterKnockdown CenterMuseum of the City of New YorkNo Longer Empty, School of Visual Arts Library,  and other institutions organized edit-a-thons. The celebration came to a close with “Past and Future Fictions” at MoMA PS1 on April 1st. Part of VW Sunday Sessions, the program focused on radical archiving—both the preservation of politically potent content and the assertion of archiving as a radical act.  Black Lunch TableBarnard Zine LibraryBluestockingsRadical ReferenceNYC Trans Oral History ProjectThe GenderFail Archive ProjectThe ICP Library, and Pilot Press filled the VW Dome with their archives and collaborated on short discussions covering practical and theoretical elements of their work, and what is needed to preserve and document underrepresented histories.

Art+Feminism’s regional organizers continue to expand the project’s resonance and reach. This year we focused on Latin America, where Melissa Tamani has done concentrated outreach, doubling the number of events.  These nearly 30 events stretched from Laboratorio Cultural del Norte, Chihuahua, Mexico, to the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de Santiago. We sustained last year’s focus on West Africa, where Mohammed Sadat Abdulai has facilitated events at a variety of cultural and educational institutions. Stacey Allan and Amber Berson continue our growth in California and Canada respectively, bringing on partners like SFMOMA and Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal. Addie Wagenknecht continued to expand our reach with cultural institutions in Europe.

Edit-a-thons took place during the months of March and April at hundreds of institutions across the globe, including Anchorage Museum; Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson; Auckland Central Library; Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore; University of California, Berkeley; Liebig12, Berlin; Untitled Art Society, Calgary; University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; University College Cork; Memorial University, Corner Brook; The University of Western Australia, Crawley; University of North Texas, Denton; University of New Hampshire, Durham; National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin; Trinity College, University of Dublin; Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; Uffizi Gallery, Florence; Bibliothèque d’art et d’archéologie des Musées d’art et d’histoire, Genève; Tentmaker Ghana; Glasgow Print Studio; The Menil Collection, Houston; Goethe Zentrum Kampala; Siddhartha Cottage, Kathmandu; Modern Fuel and Queen’s University, Kingston; Biblioteca Nacional de Portugal, Lisbon; Muzeum Sztuki w Łodzi MS2; The Photographers’ Gallery, London; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Caffi Alys, Machynlleth; Artexte and Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal; Lenbachhaus München; Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick; Yale University, New Haven; Smith College, Northampton; Norsk Komponistforening, Oslo; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Princeton University; Mount Allison University, Sackville; Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego; Art Practical and For-Site Foundation, San Francisco; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Stanford University; Index, Stockholm; Fisher Library, University of Sydney; womany wonderland, Taipei City; Temple University, Japan Campus, Tokyo; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa; Blitz, Valletta; The Clark Art Institute, Williamstown; Afroleadership, Yaoundé; and online with Women in Red.

Founded in 2014 by Siân Evans, Jacqueline Mabey, Michael Mandiberg and Laurel Ptak, Art+Feminism is a do-it-yourself campaign to improve coverage of gender, feminism and the arts on Wikipedia, and to encourage women editors. Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented; in a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as women. This lack of participation has led to significant gaps in content on world’s most popular online research tool. Since 2014, over 10,000 people at more than 800 events around the world have participated in Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thons, resulting in the creation and improvement of more than 33,000 articles on Wikipedia.

The 2018 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon is organized by Art+Feminism, led by Siân EvansJacqueline MabeyMcKensie Mack; and Michael Mandiberg, in collaboration with AfroCROWDBlack Lunch TableWomen in Red; the Professional Organization for Women in the Arts (POWarts); and The Museum of Modern Art. Art+Feminism receives support from Qubit New Music and Wikimedia New York City. The Art+Feminism leadership collective includes Mohammed Sadat AbdulaiStacey AllanAmber BersonSara ClugageRichard KnipelStuart PriorMelissa Tamani; and Addie Wagenknecht.

Wikipedia Edit-a-thon: Art+Feminism at The Museum of Modern Art is supported by The Modern Women’s Fund.

The Art+Feminism initiative is made possible by the Wikimedia Foundation.

Buy your tickets now for Past and Future Fictions, taking place on Sunday, April 1st at MoMA PS1.

To mark the culmination of the 5th annual Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon, VW Sunday Sessions brings together projects and organizations whose missions focus on radical archiving—both the preservation of politically potent content and the assertion of archiving as a radical act.

If you missed the panel discussion at MoMA, you can watch it on YouTube.

February 12, 2018
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Press Contact: Molly Kurzius, molly_kurzius@moma.org

2018 WIKIPEDIA EDIT-A-THON
SATURDAY, MARCH 3
AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

WITH HUNDREDS OF EVENTS INTERNATIONALLY
THROUGHOUT THE MONTH OF MARCH

FIFTH ANNIVERSARY IS MARKED WITH EVENTS
EVERY WEEKEND IN NEW YORK CITY

New York City — Art+Feminism’s fIfth-annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, an all-day event designed to generate coverage of feminism and the arts on Wikipedia and encourage women editors, will take place on March 3, 2018, at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, with hundreds of partner events around the world. Featuring tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, ongoing editing support, reference materials, childcare, and refreshments, the much-anticipated event will take place at the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Education and Research Building, 4 West 54 Street, on Saturday, March 3, 2018, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

“Beginning this project, we knew that our role would not only be to empower women — we use the most expansive definition of that term — to edit online but to stand with them as they are challenged by those who do not see value in their perspective,” said Art+Feminism organizers Siân Evans, Jacqueline Mabey, McKensie Mack, and Michael Mandiberg. “Art+Feminism is about making Wikipedia a more complete and representative source of information, but it doesn’t end there for us. It’s about dismantling systems of thought that diminish or erase entirely the place in the history of people from marginalized communities.”

To address these issues, the Edit-a-thon will feature a series of programs throughout the day. This year’s edit-a-thon kicks off with “Careful with Each Other, Dangerous Together,” a conversation about the relationship between structures of inequality and structures of the Internet, the affective labor of Internet activism, and creating inclusive online communities. Design researcher and artist Caroline Sinders will moderate the discussion between Sydette Harry, Editor, Mozilla Foundation, and Editor-at-Large, Coral Project and Sarah Jaffe, Reporting Fellow, the Nation Institute, and author of Necessary Trouble: Americans in Revolt. Afternoon breakout groups will include bias training, using Wikipedia in the classroom, and gallery sessions exploring feminist art.

In addition to the Edit-a-thon at The Museum of Modern Art, New York City will play host to 20 Art+Feminism-related events throughout February, March, and April to celebrate the fifth year of Art+Feminism. Amongst other institutions, edit-a-thons are being organized by No Longer Empty; Bard Graduate Center; Barnard College; Black Lunch Table; Columbia University; CUNY Graduate Center; Interference Archive; The Jewish Museum; Kickstarter; Museum of the City of New York; School of Visual Arts Library; and Triangle Art Association.

Special programs in celebration of Art+Feminism’s fifth anniversary include: an Art+Feminism WikiData training and conversation between Katherine Maher, Executive Director, Wikimedia Foundation and Loic Tallon, Chief Digital Officer, The Met, moderated by Dennis K. Berman, Business Editor, The Wall Street Journal at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on February 13; a panel on the representation of women in the Digital Era at the Consulate General of France featuring Art+Feminism co-founders; and a program at MoMA PS1 as part of VW Sunday Sessions on April 1 focused on radical archiving — both the preservation of politically potent content and the assertion of archiving as a radical act. Marking the culmination of the month-long Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon, the event brings together New York-based organizations including Black Lunch Table; Barnard Zine Library; Bluestockings; Radical Reference; NYC Trans Oral History Project; The GenderFail Archive Project with The ICP Library; and Pilot Press, who will fill the VW Dome with their archives and collaborate on short discussions covering practical and theoretical elements of their work, and what is needed to preserve and document underrepresented histories.

Edit-a-thons will take place during the month of March at hundreds of institutions across the globe, including Spelman College, Atlanta; La (3) de l’Apolo, Barcelona; University of California, Berkeley; The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; Queensland College of Art, Griffith University, Brisbane; Consejo Profesional de Arquitectura y Urbanismo, Buenos Aires; Squeaky Wheel Film & Media Art Center, Buffalo; Cardiff University; J. Erik Jonsson Central Library, Dallas; University College Dublin; Art Gallery of Alberta, Edmonton; Musée d’Art et d’Histoire, Geneva; Vasireddy Venkatadri Institute of Technology, Guntur; The Menil Collection, Houston; Baexong Arts Kyoto; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; MS2, Lodz; Espacio Fundación Telefónica, Lima; Chelsea College of Arts, London; Museo Universitario del Chopo, Mexico City; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Artexte, Montreal; Wikimedians of Nepal; Yale University, New Haven; Nnamdi Azikiwe Library, University of Nigeria, Nsukka; California College of the Arts, Oakland; National Art Center, Ottawa; New School, Paris; Princeton University; RISD Library, Providence; Museu Histórico Nacional, Rio de Janeiro; Rome Maxxi; Universidad Fidélitas, San Pedro; Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Santiago; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Philadelphia Museum of Art; New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe; University of St. Andrews; Index, Stockholm; Atelier Stroud; Custard Cream Co-Working Space, Taiwan; Blitz, Valletta; Belkin Art Gallery, Vancouver; National Museum of Women of the Arts, Washington, DC; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC; The Clark Art Institute, Williamstown; and online in a month-long edit-a-thon led by Women in Red. An updating list of venues can be found on the Art+Feminism’s website: http://www.artandfeminism.org/find-an-event/

Founded in 2014 by Siân Evans, Jacqueline Mabey, Michael Mandiberg and Laurel Ptak, Art+Feminism is a do-it-yourself campaign to improve coverage of gender, feminism and the arts on Wikipedia, and to encourage women editors. Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented; in a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as women. This lack of participation has led to significant gaps in content on world’s most popular online research tool. Since 2014, over 7,000 people at more than 500 events around the world have participated in Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thons, resulting in the creation and improvement of more than 11,000 articles on Wikipedia.

The 2018 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon is organized by Art+Feminism, led by Siân Evans; Jacqueline Mabey; McKensie Mack; and Michael Mandiberg, in collaboration with AfroCROWD; Black Lunch Table; Women in Red; the Professional Organization for Women in the Arts (POWarts); and The Museum of Modern Art. Art+Feminism receives support from Qubit New Music and Wikimedia New York City. The Art+Feminism leadership collective includes Mohammed Sadat Abdulai; Stacey Allan; Amber Berson; Sara Clugage; Richard Knipel; Stuart Prior; Melissa Tamani; and Addie Wagenknecht.

Wikipedia Edit-a-thon: Art+Feminism at The Museum of Modern Art is supported by The Modern Women’s Fund.

The Art+Feminism initiative is made possible by the Wikimedia Foundation.

Jenny Holzer's Abuse of Power Comes as No Surprise

We’ve always tried to be responsive and responsible in our organizing, to be feminist in both name and practice. For these reasons, Art+Feminism will not be buying an Art & Education ad as we have in years past. Art and Education is a joint venture between e-flux and Artforum. The management of Artforum enabled the sexual predation of Knight Landesman for years, and has now made legal actions against the victims brave enough to speak out. We will not condone this behavior with our ad dollars. Further, we call on e-flux to live up to its stated politics, to upend the status quo and use their power in service of those impacted by systemic injustice: Suspend their relationship with Artforum until Knight Landesman is no longer a co-owner, and Artforum retracts its motion to dismiss Amanda Schmitt’s lawsuit.

In solidarity with Not Surprised #notsurprised #stillnotsurprised

In the lastest episode of </rant> we spoke with Caroline Sinders, one of our favorite humans, about community, care and trying not to be an asshole.

Celebrate the fifth anniversary of Art+Feminism by wearing one of our shirts to your edit-a-thon this March! All proceeds from this campaign will benefit amazing organizations we really believe in: Black Lives Matter,The National Network of Abortion Funds and United We DreamClick here to buy a shirt on Bonfire.

It’s time for another session of Office Hours with Art+Feminism. This time co-founder and co-lead organizer Jacqueline Mabey is showing us how to edit on Wikipedia. Show up to our Facebook page on Feb 1st to ask questions in real time about the basics and best practices of editing on the platform. RSVP to let us know you’re coming.

CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 Michal Janček

We’re pleased to share that we’re collaborating with MoMA PS1 to mark the culmination of the 5th annual Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon. Past and Future Fictions brings together a number of projects and organizations whose mission involve the social justice-oriented preservation of information. If we accept the Derridean assertion that in the archive holds immense political power but that the term itself is so loosely defined, the joyous, carnivalesque space created with music, cotton candy, and anti-surveillance face painting will help trouble any feminist notion of the archive as concrete reality. These organizations will fill the VW Dome with the objects and actions associated with their specific archives for public engagement and production. During the day, the groups will be paired for short discussions covering elements practical, theoretical, and speculative of their work, teasing out what’s at stake in preserving histories of underrepresented subjects.

Participants include Black Lunch Table, Barnard Zine Library, Bluestockings, Radical Reference, NYC Trans Oral History Project, and Pilot Press

MORE INFO

Episode #2 of features a group of badass librarians. We talked with Jenny Ferretti, Amanda Meeks, and Kai Alexis Smith about information activism, wishing Twitter was your boyfriend and the unbearable whiteness of librarianship.

We’re super excited to announce the launch of </rant>, our pop-up podcast where we talk to some of the awesome folks we’ve met through the Art+Feminism project. For our debut episode, we talk with the artist and educator Angela Washko about the manosphere, self-care, and art making in the age of Trump.

“The reality is that, for all the sustained and meaningful efforts of so many, gender bias remains very real today. And like most things in 2017, this bias, in its many guises, plays out pretty well on the internet.” Refinery 29‘s Lily Silverton spoke with Art+Feminism. 

ORGANIZERS ALSO DEBUT NEW ART COMMISSIONING PROGRAM

New York City — Over 2,500 participants at more than 200 events around the world participated in Art+Feminism’s fourth annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, which took place across the month of March around Women’s History Month. This global effort created or improved nearly 6,500 articles on Wikipedia, almost twice the output of the 2016 events. The month-long series of Edit-a-thon events was designed to generate coverage of feminism and the arts on Wikipedia — a response to the well-known gender gap on Wikipedia.

Highlights of the 2017 Edit-a-thon include content added to Wikipedia pages for niv Acosta, Hilma af Klint, Morehshin Allahyari, Xenobia Bailey, Rebecca Belmore, Hannah Black, Octavia E. Butler, Lygia Clark, Andrea Crespo, Leslie Hewitt, Christine Sun Kim, Deana Lawson, New media art, Sondra Perry, Paul B. Preciado, and Martine Syms.

“We were heartened by the response to our call to arms to fight against disinformation and fake news with facts,” said Art+Feminism organizers Siân Evans, Jacqueline Mabey, McKensie Mack, and Michael Mandiberg. “The efforts of Art+Feminism participants in 42 countries across the world nearly doubled last year’s results. We continue to be inspired by all the dedicated folks who make room in their busy schedules to share skills and improve a collectively held resource like Wikipedia.”

On the eve of the March edit-a-thons, Art+Feminism announced the debut of the Call to Action Art Commission program. Each year, an artist will be commissioned to create a Creative Commons licensed artwork. Divya Mehra was selected for the inaugural commission. Her work Dangerous Women (Blaze of Glory), 2017 depicts a jerrycan with the word “edit” emblazoned on the face of the container. With a dry, disruptive sense of humor, the work suggests a source of untapped energy and the need for reinvigorating change. Mehra’s research-fuelled practice explores diasporic identities, racialization, otherness, and the construct of diversity. Her work has been exhibited and screened at Creative Time, MoMA PS1, MTV, The Queens Museum of Art, MASS MoCA, amongst others. Mehra holds an MFA from Columbia University and is represented in Toronto by Georgia Scherman Projects, Toronto.

In New York, the edit-a-thon at The Museum of Modern Art featured a panel discussion between writer Joanne McNeil and Data & Society Research Institute Fellow Zara Rahman, moderated by Kimberly Drew (aka @museummammy), social media manager for the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The lively discussion covered a range of topics, from the panelists first encounters with the Internet to concrete steps for breaking out of information echo chambers. There was a series of informal conversations during the afternoon, led by Interference Archive, AfroCROWD and The Black Lunch Table, and Maryland Institute College of Art Digital Initiatives Librarian Jenny Ferretti and Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture Reference Librarian and Archivist Alexsandra Mitchell, and a collectively run working group on power structures in notability guidelines on Wikipedia.

The 2017 Art+Feminism Edit-a-thon grew in complexity and geographic scope. First time organizing institutions included Open Foundation West Africa in collaboration with African Women Development Fund, Accra; Spelman College, Atlanta; Transgender Europe in collaboration with Artists Without a Cause and Room 4 Resistance, Berlin; Griffith University, Brisbane; Bryn Mawr College; Government Museum and Art Gallery, Chandigarh; Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit; National University of Ireland, Galway; Women’s Library and Information Centre Foundation, Istanbul; Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles; Oslo National Academy of the Arts; Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, Montréal; PLATFORM, Munich; University of Nigeria, Nsukka; Parsons Paris; Maus Hábitos, Porto; Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Puerto Rico, San Juan; The Royal Armoury, Stockholm; Gardiner Museum, Toronto; and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC. Organizers in Geneva, Switzerland coordinated city-wide edit-a-thons at Centre de la photographie, Lestime, Musée d’art et d’histoire de Genève, Pavillon bleu and l’Université de Genève. For the first time edit-a-thons were held across Italy at the Uffizi Gallery, Florence; BASE Milano; Museo Archeologico Provinciale, Potenza; Rome MAXXI; Artè Caffè Culturale, Salerno; and Ca’ Foscari University, Venice.

Art+Feminism is a do-it-yourself campaign to improve coverage of feminism and the arts on Wikipedia, and to encourage female editorship. Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented; in a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that fewer than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to significant gaps in content on world’s most popular online research tool. Since 2014, over 7,100 people at more than 480 events around the world have participated in Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thons, resulting in the creation and improvement of more than 11,100 articles on Wikipedia. Following the success of the inaugural event in 2014, the co-founders were named to Foreign Policy magazine’s list of 2014 Leading Global Thinkers.

The 2017 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon was organized by Art+Feminism, led by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America’s Women and Art Special Interest Group, Jacqueline Mabey/failed projects, McKensie Mack and Michael Mandiberg, in collaboration with AfroCROWD, Women in Red, the Professional Organization for Women in the Arts (POWarts) and The Museum of Modern Art and with support from Wikimedia DC, and Wikimedia NYC. Major support for the event at The Museum of Modern Art was provided by The Modern Women’s Fund. Major support for Art+Feminism is provided by the Wikimedia Foundation.

“As Wikipedia becomes increasingly influential (it is now the fifth most-visited site in the world, up from seventh in 2015) ‘absences there echo across the internet,’ said Art+Feminism. Google now pulls its biographical sidebar information from Wikipedia, as does MoMA’s online artist pages. ‘The work we are doing feels more pressing than when we started, as Wikipedia’s content is even more visible and more trusted than when we started this project.'” Artsy on Art+Feminism.

“Information activism is perhaps even more important when we’re facts are ever increasingly being thrown by the wayside. ‘While we don’t have any specific plans to address Trump’s presidency and policies, we do see our project as particularly vital at this point in history. Affirming the importance of the work of women and other marginalized communities is pivotal,’ says Siân Evans, who works as a librarian day to day.” Art+Feminism spoke with Huck‘s Marta Bausells.

‘We believe that feminism is a lens that throws all systems producing inequality into doubt, and a reflective process through which we can work to dismantle interconnected modalities of oppression,’ the group told the Observer. ‘Art is fundamental to the creation of thriving, open societies. So, too, are open access educational resources.'” The New York Observer‘s John Bonazzo covers Art+Feminism.

“There are ordinary Wikipedia-edit-a-thons, and then there is Art+Feminism, which you might call the mother of them all. What began in 2014 as a small effort to increase the visibility of women on Wikipedia has grown into a multifaceted, worldwide phenomenon that takes place every March (coinciding with Women’s History Month in the US and International Women’s Day). It’s a unique and inspiring push for digital visibility.” Jillian Steinhauer covers Art+Feminism for Hyperallergic.

FOURTH-ANNUAL EVENT TO FEATURE PANEL DISCUSSION ON INFORMATION ACTIVISM

New York City — The fourth-annual Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, an all-day event designed to generate coverage of feminism and the arts on Wikipedia and encourage female editorship, will take place on March 11, 2017 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, with hundreds of partner events around the world. Featuring tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, ongoing editing support, reference materials, childcare, and refreshments, the much-anticipated event will take place at the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Education and Research Building, 4 West 54 Street, on Saturday, March 11, 2017 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

“We’ve been deeply disturbed by the sheer amount of fake news on social media, and its possible influence on the U.S. election,” said Art+Feminism organizers Siân Evans, Jacqueline Mabey, McKensie Mack, and Michael Mandiberg. “Wikipedia is something that belongs to all of us. It’s not a privately held resource, its content isn’t motivated by the whims of any owners. When you have a government actively pushing ‘alternative facts,’ improving the reliability and completeness of Wikipedia is an important act of everyday resistance.”

To address these issues, the Edit-a-thon will feature a series of programs throughout the day. The event will launch at 10 a.m. with an expansive conversation between writer Joanne McNeil and Data & Society Research Institute Fellow Zara Rahman, moderated by Kimberly Drew (aka @museummammy), social media manager for the Metropolitan Museum of Art and creator of the Tumblr “Black Contemporary Art.” The talk will explore how to increase public awareness of reliable sources and methods for sharing difficult to access information with a broad public. Afternoon breakout groups will engage in focused discussions about related issues including intersectionality and librarianship, power structures in notability guidelines on Wikipedia, and radical archives. As well, AfroCROWD and POWarts will have tables in the Cullman Building mezzanine with their own lists of articles needing improvement. Respectively, AfroCROWD seeks to increase the number of people of the African diaspora who participate in Wikimedia projects and POWarts champions the professional lives of women in the art world.

Hundreds of events will take place at institutions across the globe. Outreach efforts in Africa and Latin America have led to events in Ghana, Nigeria, Zimbabwe, Tunisia, as well as in Argentina, Chile, Costa Rica, and Peru and others. Additionally, a number of influential art institutions will hold an Art+Feminism event for the first time, including: Mairangi Arts Centre, Auckland; MOCA Detroit; Centre de la Photographie Genève; Arsenic, Centre d’Art scénique contemporain, Lausanne; Serpentine Galleries; Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles; Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions; BASE Milano; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Maus Hábitos, Porto; Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Puerto Rico; MAXXI, Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo, Rome; Walter and McBean Galleries, San Francisco Art Institute; Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Santiago; The Royal Armoury, Stockholm; and Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC. Entering into the fourth year of the Art+Feminism project, many groups have expanded their events to include related programming. Inspired by the work of José Esteban Munoz, the edit-a-thon at Archives Nationales, Paris organized by Lafayette Anticipations features a dynamic schedule of talks and performances by artists and scholars including Vaginal Davis, Wu Tsang and Elvan Zabunyan. The Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Vancouver is situating their edit-a-thon in the context of a larger, ongoing project investigating activism, art, and archives emerging from social movements of the 1970s. Elevate Festival, Graz will include an edit-a-thon as a part of their program on political discourse and activism. And in New York, Kickstarter has partnered with The Creative Independent, NEW INC, Black Lunch Table, Pioneer Works, Rhizome and Flux Factory to host an edit-a-thon at their Greenpoint, Brooklyn headquarters.

An updating list of venues can be found on the Art+Feminism’s website: http://www.artandfeminism.org/find-an-event/

Founded in 2014 by Siân Evans, Jacqueline Mabey, Michael Mandiberg and Laurel Ptak, Art+Feminism is a do-it-yourself campaign to improve coverage of feminism and the arts on Wikipedia, and to encourage female editorship. Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented; in a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to significant gaps in content on world’s most popular online research tool. Since 2014, over 4,600 people at more than 280 events around the world have participated in Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thons, resulting in the creation and improvement of more than 4,600 articles on Wikipedia. Following the success of the inaugural event in 2014, the organizers were named to Foreign Policy magazine’s list of 2014 Leading Global Thinkers.

Supported by a $100,000 grant from the Wikimedia Foundation for 2017, Art+Feminism has expanded its leadership to be more international and inclusive. McKensie Mack joins Art+Feminism as its inaugural Program Coordinator. McKensie is a management consultant, producer, and strategist specializing in community development, anti-oppression and operational efficiency. A dynamic group of curators, art historians and experienced Wikipedians act as project Ambassadors nationally and internationally, including Mohammed Sadat Abdulai, Accra; Stacey Allan, Los Angeles; Amber Berson, Montreal; Melissa Tamani, Lima; and Richard Knipel, for the Wikipedia community. Artist Addie Wagenknecht is expanding the project’s European footprint, and Daniela Capistrano and Brittany Oliver have been engaged to facilitate outreach to queer communities and communities of color nationally.

The 2017 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon is organized by Art+Feminism, led by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America’s Women and Art Special Interest Group, Jacqueline Mabey/failed projects, McKensie Mack and Michael Mandiberg, in collaboration with AfroCROWD, Women in Red, POWarts (Professional Organization for Women in the Arts) and The Museum of Modern Art and with support from Wikimedia DC and Wikimedia NYC. Major support for the event at The Museum of Modern Art is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund. Major support for Art+Feminism is provided by the Wikimedia Foundation.

“In a statement, the organizers said, ‘Wikipedia is something that belongs to all of us. It’s not a privately held resource, its content isn’t motivated by the whims of any owners. When you have a government actively pushing ‘alternative facts,’ improving the reliability and completeness of Wikipedia is an important act of everyday resistance.'” Art+Feminism in Artforum.

“The edit-a-thon began with a restatement of the day’s main objective: to combat Wikipedia’s well-documented gender gap by improving, however incrementally, its coverage of women in the arts. In spite of the site’s ostensibly egalitarian, accessible format, more than ninety per cent of its editors are male, according to a study conducted in 2011 by the Wikimedia Foundation.” Talia Lavin covers Art+Feminism for The New Yorker.

MARK SUCCESS OF ART+FEMINISM’S 2016 WIKIPEDIA EDIT-A-THON

New York City — Over 2500 participants at more than 175 events around the world participated in Art+Feminism’s third annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, resulting in the creation of 2000 new pages and improvements to 1500 articles on Wikipedia. This represents a significant increase over the 2015 events, with more than double the number of participants and triple the number of articles created or improved. Organized around Women’s History Month, the Edit-a-thon was designed to generate coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia and encourage female editorship — a response to the well-known gender gap on Wikipedia.

Alongside the central event at The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the 175+ events were held across every inhabited continent and in 30 countries at venues including: Ashesi University Brekuso, Accra; Tate Britain, London; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo, Mexico City; Gus Fisher Gallery, The University of Auckland; Archives Nationales, Paris; The Menil Collection, Houston; SCAD Hong Kong; Espacio Fundación Telefónica, Lima; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC.; and a month-long online edit-a-thon hosted by Women In Red. As of this writing an additional 10+ events are scheduled for later in April.

Highlights of the 2016 Edit-a-thon include new Wikipedia pages for Unity Bainbridge, Manon de Boer, Tina Charlie, Otelia Cromwell, Aurora Reyes Flores, Liz Magic Laser, Park McArthur, Elizabeth McIntosh, Divya Mehra, Anne Pasternak, and Sara Greenberger Rafferty and improved articles for Megumi Igarashi, Julie Mehretu, Ana Mendieta, Wangechi Mutu, Lorraine O’Grady, Porpentine, Faith Ringgold, Martine Sims, Carrie Mae Weems, and Zitkala-Sa. Detailed results for many of the global events are being catalogued on Wikipedia on an ongoing basis, viewable on our 2016 Outcomes page.

In New York, the Edit-a-thon featured an expansive conversation on contemporary feminisms and digital culture with writer Orit Gat, artist and activist Reina Gossett, and New York Times technology columnist Jenna Wortham, moderated by Fiona Romeo, MoMA’s Director of Digital Content and Strategy and afternoon breakout groups about related issues, including intellectual property, notability, and LGBTQ visibility on Wikipedia. In Paris, 600 participants convened for two days of long table conversation and editing at the Archives Nationales. And in València, the City Councilor in charge of gender equality, Isabel Lozano, attended and edited.

 

Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented; in a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to an alarming dearth of content about women and art in the world’s most popular online research tool. Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thon impacts the gender gap through crucial improvements to art and feminism related subjects on Wikipedia. In 2014, the Art+Feminism organizers were named to Foreign Policy magazine’s list of Leading Global Thinkers.

The 2016 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon was organized by Art+Feminism, led by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America’s Women and Art Special Interest Group, Jacqueline Mabey/failed projects, and Michael Mandiberg, in collaboration with the Professional Organization for Women in the Arts (POWarts) and The Museum of Modern Art, with support from Tekserve, Wikimedia NYC and the Wikimedia Foundation.

THIRD-ANNUAL EVENT TO FEATURE PANEL DISCUSSION ON CONTEMPORARY FEMINISM

New York City — Art+Feminism’s third annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, an all-day event designed to generate coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia and encourage female editorship, will take place on March 5, 2016 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Featuring tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, ongoing editing support, reference materials, childcare, and refreshments, the much-anticipated event will take place at the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Education and Research Building, 4 West 54 Street, on March 5, 2016 from from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Edit-a-thon will launch at 10 a.m. with an expansive conversation on contemporary feminisms and digital culture with writer Orit Gat, artist and activist Reina Gossett, and New York Times technology columnist Jenna Wortham, moderated by Fiona Romeo, MoMA’s Director of Digital Content and Strategy. Continuing this discussion, afternoon breakout groups will engage in focused conversations about related issues, including intellectual property, notability, and LGBTQ visibility on Wikipedia.

Node edit-a-thons will take place in the month of March at over 125 venues in over 20 countries on every inhabited continent, including Ashesi University Brekuso, Accra; Tate Britain, London; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo, Mexico City; Gus Fisher Gallery, The University of Auckland; Archives Nationales, Paris; The Menil Collection, Houston; SCAD Hong Kong; Espacio Fundación Telefónica, Lima; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; and the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC.

“Our focus this year is intersectional feminisms,” said the lead co-organizers, Siân Evans, Jacqueline Mabey and Michael Mandiberg. “Feminism is not just an idea, but a practice: a way of organizing that is inclusive, collaborative, horizontal, with consensus-based decision making. With this in mind, we have convened a group of experienced community organizers to review our materials and methods. Their findings will shape the form of our materials going forward. We did this to better serve Art+Feminism participants, and to create a welcoming space for all members of the public who wish to participate.”

In March 2015, over 1,500 participants joined Art+Feminism’s second annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon at The Museum of Modern Art in New York and more than 75 satellite events around the world, resulting in the creation of nearly 400 new pages and significant improvements to 500 articles on Wikipedia—including articles about female artists, feminist artistic movements, and feminist scholarship. Following the success of the inaugural event in 2014, the organizers were named to Foreign Policy magazine’s list of 2014 Leading Global Thinkers.

Art+Feminism is a rhizomatic campaign to improve coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia, and to encourage female editorship. Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented; in a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to an alarming dearth of content about women and art in the world’s most popular online research tool. Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thons and other initiatives make an impact on the gender gap through crucial improvements to art and feminism related subjects on Wikipedia. To facilitate the expansion of Art+Feminism in 2016, the Wikimedia Foundation has renewed their support with a $56,000 grant, supplementing $25,000 in previous funding.

Node edit-a-thons are being planned for the month of March at over 125 venues across every inhabited continent, including: National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth; Ashesi University, Accra; Gus Fisher Gallery, The University of Auckland; The Banff Centre; Kaskadenkondensator, Basel; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; Interference Archive, Brooklyn; Massachusetts Institute of Technology Libraries, Cambridge; Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town; School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh; SCAD Hong Kong; The Menil Collection, Houston; Cornell University, Ithaca; Baexong Arts Kyoto; Espacio Fundación Telefónica, Lima; Kunsthaus Hafenstraße, Linz; Institute of Contemporary Arts, London; Tate Britain, London; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; México, Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo (UNAM), Alumnos 47, and Centro de Cultura Digital Estela de Luz, Mexico City; Canadian Women Art History Initiative, Concordia University, Montréal; McGill, Montréal; Yale University, New Haven; Newcomb Art Museum, Tulane University, New Orleans; Smith College, Northampton; Archives Nationales, Paris; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh; Yale Union, Portland; Rhode Island School of Design, Providence; California College of the Arts, San Francisco; New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe; Savannah College of Art and Design; Hallwylska museet, Stockholm; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Bibliothèque diocésaine de Tunis; Biblioteca Municipal Carmelina Sánchez-Cutillas, Valencia; Emily Carr University of Art and Design, The University of British Columbia, and Western Front, Vancouver; The Pennsylvania State University, University Park; Rose Art Museum and Rosebud, Brandeis University, Waltham; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C.; and online all month long as part of the Women in Red edit-a-thon. The complete list of venues can be found on the Art+Feminism meet up page.

The 2016 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon is organized by Art+Feminism, led by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America’s Women and Art Special Interest Group, Jacqueline Mabey/failed projects, and Michael Mandiberg, in collaboration with the Professional Organization for Women in the Arts (POWarts) and The Museum of Modern Art, with support from Tekserve, Wikimedia NYC and the Wikimedia Foundation.

“The under-representation of women is not a product of the digital age and the predominantly male editorship of Wikipedia—which we’ll return to shortly; the digital age is merely, in its current state, a continuation of how things have always been. In the past this dearth has certainly been documented, as Virginia Woolf said, with more bitter resignation to the fact, ‘anonymous was a woman.'” Artslant on the 3rd annual Art+Feminism Edit-a-thon.

New York City — Over 1500 participants at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and at more than 75 satellite events around the world participated in Art+Feminism’s second annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, resulting in the creation of nearly 400 new pages and significant improvements to 500 articles on Wikipedia. Organized around International Women’s Day, the Edit-a-thon was designed to generate coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia and encourage female editorship — a response to the well-known gender gap on Wikipedia. In addition to the New York hub at The Museum of Modern Art, where 200 people gathered, events were held across the U.S. and in 17 countries around the globe at venues including the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Sonntags Club, Berlin; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; The Dowse Art Museum, New Zealand; Fondation Galeries Lafayette, Paris; and Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto.

Highlights of the 2015 Edit-a-thon include new Wikipedia pages for Elise Forrest Harleston, Amy Maria Sacker, Janet Payne Bowles, Lisl Steiner, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Kali, Betty G. Miller, Camille Henrot, Sarah McEneaney, Kyle DeWoody, Jennie C. Jones, and the Heresies Collective and improved articles for Cecily Brown, Elaine de Kooning, Evelyn De Morgan, Carol Shaw, Coco Fusco, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Valerie Hegarty, Yael Bartana, and Augusta Savage. Detailed results for many of the global events are being catalogued on Wikipedia on an ongoing basis (http://bit.ly/2015Outcomes).

Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented; in a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to an alarming dearth of content about women and art in the world’s most popular online research tool. Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thon impacts the gender gap through crucial improvements to art and feminism related subjects on Wikipedia. In 2014, the Art+Feminism organizers were named to Foreign Policy magazine’s list of Leading Global Thinkers.

The 2015 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon was organized by Art+Feminism, led by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America’s Women and Art Special Interest Group, Dorothy Howard, Jacqueline Mabey/failed projects, and Michael Mandiberg, in collaboration with the Professional Organization for Women in the Arts (POWarts) and The Museum of Modern Art, and with support from Tekserve and Wikimedia NYC.

“Some form of arts. Siân Evans and I met at McGill University, where we both studied art history. Michael Mandiberg is an artist and a professor. We’ve always said that this is an intervention as feminists but also as artists, art workers, art historians, and art librarians. The content on Wikipedia about the arts isn’t great, and it’s worth standing up and saying that women’s work matters, but art also matters.” Artnews covers the edit-a-thon at MoMA.

“On Saturday, in a quiet room overlooking the snowy sculpture garden at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, Jon Liechty was trying to translate the Wikipedia entry for the feminist artist Judy Chicago into Esperanto, an artificial language invented in 1887.” The Wall Street Journal‘s Anna Russell reporting from MoMA.

“Last year’s event, which drew participants in six countries, resulted in more 100 new articles on female artists, feminist artistic movements and feminist scholarship and improvements to more than 90 articles, according to a news release. And there are signs that similar efforts across other topic areas may be having a broad effect.” Jennifer Schuessler covers Art+Feminism for The New York Times.

New York Event Set to Take Place at the Museum of Modern Art with Over 55 Satellite Events Around the World

New York City — Art+Feminism is pleased to announce its second annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, an all-day event  designed to generate coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia and encourage female editorship. The event will take place at The Museum of Modern Art on Saturday, March 7, 2015 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m and include tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, ongoing Wikipedia support, reference materials, childcare, and refreshments. Satellite edit-a-thons will be held over International Women’s Day weekend (March 6-8) in over 55 venues across the U.S. and around the world, including the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Sonntags Club, Berlin; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; The Dowse Art Museum, New Zealand; Fondation Galeries Lafayette, Paris; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; and online in a Google Hangout.

Wikipedia’s gender trouble is well-documented; in a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to an alarming dearth of content about women and art in the world’s most popular online research tool. Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thon will make an impact on the gender gap through crucial improvements to art and feminism related subjects on Wikipedia.

In February 2014, 600 participants convened in 31 locations across six countries for Art+Feminism’s first Wikipedia Edit-a-thon. Over the course of the day, over 100 new articles were created, and at least 90 improved–including articles about female artists, feminist artistic movements, and feminist scholarship. Following the success of the event, the organizers were named to Foreign Policy magazine’s 2014 list of Leading Global Thinkers.

The headquarters for Art+Feminism’s Second Annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thon is The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Education and Research Building at The Museum of Modern Art, 4 West 54 Street. The event will be held on Saturday, March 7, 2015 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The 2015 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon is organized by Art+Feminism, led by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America’s Women and Art Special Interest Group, Dorothy Howard, Jacqueline Mabey/failed projects, and Michael Mandiberg, in collaboration with the Professional Organization for Women in the Arts (POWarts) and The Museum of Modern Art.

Over 55 satellite edit-a-thons will take place across 11 countries over International Women’s Day weekend, March 6-8, 2015. Confirmed hosts include: Main Library, University of Georgia, Athens; Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives, The Banff Centre; School of Information, University of Texas at Austin; Sonntags Club, Berlin; Indiana University Bloomington; Morton R Godine Library at The Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Boston; Brooklyn Museum; F/LAT, Brussels; John M. Flaxman Library, School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Kelvin Smith Library, Case Western Reserve, Cleveland; Den Frie Udstillingsbygning, Copenhagen; Hannah Maclure Centre, University of Abertay, Dundee; Mercury Studio, Durham, NC; Central Washington University, Ellensburg; NYU Florence; Fresno Art Museum; NSCAD University Library, Halifax; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; The University of California, Irvine; University of Kentucky, Lexington; Los Angeles County Museum of Art in collaboration with East of Borneo and Women’s Center for Creative Work; The Dowse Art Museum, Lower Hutt, New Zealand; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Canadian Women’s Art History Initiative, Concordia University and Eastern Bloc, Montreal; Monongalia Art Center, Morgantown, WV; Vera Ermolaeva Foundation, Moscow; Stedelijk Museum and the Bonnefanten Museum, The Netherlands; Newcomb College Institute, New Orleans; State University of New York at New Paltz; Babycastles Gallery, New York City; University of Notre Dame; California College of the Arts, Oakland; Fondation Galeries Lafayette, Paris; Artspace, Peterborough, ON; Albert M. Greenfield Library at University of the Arts, Philadelphia; 76<100, Pittsburgh; California State Polytechnic University, Pomona; Crumpacker Family Library, Portland Art Museum; Rhode Island School of Design, Providence; State University of New York at Purchase; The University of California, San Diego; Kadist Art Foundation, San Francisco; The University of California, Santa Barbara; Pennsylvania State University, State College; Sweet Briar College; Edward P. Taylor Library & Archives at Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver; The Hepworth, Wakefield; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C.; Wardman Library, Whittier College; The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art, Winnipeg; College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA; and online in a Google Hangout with Addie Wagenknecht, with more in development.

“But unlike other spaces where women are underrepresented, Wikipedia doesn’t have any official gatekeeper excluding us. No one hires you to edit Wikipedia. Which means it’s the kind of thing you can’t really complain about unless you do your part.” Kat Stoeffel reporting from the scene at Eyebeam for New York Magazine.

“By the end of the day, around 100 new entries were up (around 80 more were enhanced). The new pages, devoted to figures ranging from Australian modernists Ethel Spowers and Dorrit Black to Catalan painter Josefa Texidor i Torres to contemporary artists including Mary MissXaviera SimmonsAudrey Flack, and Monika Bravo, vary widely in scope, grammar, and quality of content. But the Wikipedia team expects that blips will vanish as the hive mind has its work on the entries.” Artnews‘ Robin Cembalest on the 101 Wikipedia articles create by Art+Feminism participants.

“Artist Karen Adelman attended one of the MAK Center edit-a-thons, and felt invigorated by it. ‘I worry about the culture of oversharing that the Internet has cultivated, and yet also clamor constantly for more valid representations of diversity,’ she says. ‘I think an event like this one offers a dynamic solution: a real life, in-person gathering of actual people and their bodies.'” Catherine Wagley covers the LA edit-a-thons in LA Weekly.

“Next week, groups of artists and tech-savvy folks around the country are taking aim at gender imbalance in the representation of female artists on Wikipedia. The “Art + Feminism Edit-a-Thon” being held in New York on February 1st has inspired simultaneous editing marathons in 17 other cities, all focused on adding more female artists to the public encyclopedia and fleshing out the meager entries of existing women artists.” Sarah Mirk covers Art+Feminism in Bitch Magazine

Wikipedia’s content and community skews male, creating significant gaps in an increasingly important repository of shared knowledge. We invite you to address this absence in an all-day, communal updating of Wikipedia’s entries on contemporary art and feminism. There will be tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, digital and print materials to reference, childcare for the little ones, and light refreshments provided. Attendees are encouraged to edit any entry of interest related to art, feminism, gender studies, and LGBTQ issues. All are welcome: women, woman-identified, queer, and their allies.

Not in New York? Multiple satellite edit-a-thons will also happen simultaneously across North America and online. Confirmed events will take place at: Flinders University in Adelaide, Australia; De Appel in Amsterdam, The Netherlands; University of Texas at Austin School of Information; School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, MA; Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum (co-hosted by Project Continua); Parmer in Brooklyn (by invite only); Luke Lindoe Library at the Alberta College of Art and Design in Calgary, Canada; School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design in Dundee, UK: Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University; NSCAD University Library in Halifax, Canada; University of Hong Kong; University of Iowa Center for the Book in Iowa City, IA; Women’s Studio Workshop in Kingston, NY; School of Art and Design at Middlesex University, London; n.paradoxa in London (by invite only); The Public School in Los Angeles; University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Library & Information Studies; Eastern Bloc (co-hosted by Eastern Bloc, Studio XX, revue .dpi, and Skol) in Montreal, Canada; University of the Arts Greenfield Library in Philadelphia, PA; Portland State University; State University of New York at Purchase; CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco; Art Metropole in Toronto, Canada; Seattle Attic Community Workshop; National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, DC; and more locations to be announced.

For those looking to start editing early, try this tutorial (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Training/For_students) and sign in to the event (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Meetup/ArtAndFeminism#Confirmed_NYC_attendees). Childcare at the New York event requires advanced RSVP; please contact us at artandfeminismwiki@gmail.com to let us know the number of children requiring care, their ages, and what time you will be attending. If you would like to host an Edit-a-Thon, please join in. If you are looking for training materials or have questions, post on the talk page or contact the organizers at artandfeminismwiki@gmail.com.

Eyebeam is an art and technology center that provides a fertile context and state-of-the-art tools for digital research and experimentation. It is a lively incubator of creativity and thought, where artists and technologists actively engage with culture, addressing the issues and concerns of our time. Eyebeam challenges convention, celebrates the hack, educates the next generation, encourages collaboration, freely offers its contributions to the community, and invites the public to share in a spirit of openness: open source, open content, and open distribution.

Organized by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America’s Women and Art Special Interest Group, Jacqueline Mabey/The office of failed projects, Michael Mandiberg, and Laurel Ptak/Eyebeam Fellow, and Richard Knipel and Dorothy Howard (Metropolitan New York Library Council) of Wikimedia NYC.